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  • Writer's pictureWomen's Cancer Research Foundation

Bridging the Gap: Addressing Disparities in Ovarian Cancer Clinical Trial Participation

Updated: Jan 12


Disparities in Clinical Trial Participation in Ovarian Cancer

Clinical trials are at the forefront of medical research, paving the way for groundbreaking treatments and advancements in cancer care. However, disparities in clinical trial participation have long been a concern, particularly in non-gynecologic cancers. Surprisingly, the extent of these disparities within ovarian cancer clinical trials has remained relatively unexplored. A recent retrospective cohort study has shed light on the sociodemographic, cancer-related, and health system factors that influence participation in ovarian cancer clinical drug trials.


Only 5.0% of patients with ovarian cancer ever participated in a clinical drug trial.

The Study:

Conducted over a decade from 2011 to 2021, the study focused on patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer, a particularly challenging form of the disease. Researchers analyzed the degree of participation in ovarian cancer clinical drug trials among a cohort of 7,540 patients.


Ovarian Cancer Study Key Findings:


1. Low Overall Participation: The study revealed that only 5.0% of patients with ovarian cancer ever participated in a clinical drug trial. This strikingly low participation rate highlights the need for interventions to enhance access to clinical trials in this patient population.

2. Ethnic Disparities: The study uncovered significant disparities in clinical trial participation based on ethnicity. Patients of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity were 71% less likely to participate in clinical trials compared to their non-Hispanic counterparts. This finding underscores the importance of addressing barriers specific to this demographic group.

3. Racial Disparities: Patients whose race was unknown or other than Black or White were 40% less likely to participate in clinical trials. This highlights a racial disparity that warrants attention and action to promote equitable access to clinical trials for all racial groups.

4. Insurance Disparities: Health insurance played a significant role in clinical trial participation. Patients with Medicaid insurance were 51% less likely to participate, and those with Medicare were 32% less likely compared to privately-insured patients. These findings indicate the need for strategies to ensure that all patients, regardless of insurance status, can access clinical trials.


Identifying and addressing the specific barriers that patients from underrepresented groups face when considering clinical trial participation is critical.

Addressing Disparities:

The study's results underscore the urgent need to reduce disparities in ovarian cancer clinical trial participation. Several key strategies can help bridge this gap:


1. Improved Education: Enhancing patient and provider awareness of clinical trials and their potential benefits is essential. This can empower patients to consider participation and encourage healthcare providers to discuss trial options.

2. Reducing Barriers: Identifying and addressing the specific barriers that patients from underrepresented groups face when considering clinical trial participation is critical. This may include addressing language barriers, transportation issues, and financial concerns.

3. Inclusivity in Trial Design: Clinical trial design should aim to be more inclusive, ensuring that a diverse range of patients is eligible and considered. This can lead to more representative trial populations.

4. Community Engagement: Engaging with local communities and advocacy groups can help build trust and increase awareness about clinical trials. Collaborative efforts can empower individuals to seek out trial opportunities.

5. Policy and Advocacy: Advocacy efforts at both the policy and grassroots levels are vital to address systemic issues related to healthcare access and insurance coverage for clinical trials.


Advocacy efforts at both the policy and grassroots levels are vital to address systemic issues related to healthcare access and insurance coverage for clinical trials.

Conclusion:

The study's findings provide valuable insights into the disparities in ovarian cancer clinical trial participation. While the challenges are significant, they also present opportunities for healthcare providers, researchers, and advocates to work together to ensure that all women diagnosed with ovarian cancer have equitable access to the potentially life-saving treatments offered through clinical trials. By addressing these disparities, we can take significant steps toward improving outcomes and advancing ovarian cancer care.


About Women’s Cancer Research Foundation:

The Women’s Cancer Research Foundation (WCRF) is one of the most active research organizations in the nation. We are dedicated to studying and evaluating novel treatments for women afflicted with breast, ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancers. The WCRF persistently endeavors to make a difference in women’s lives by offering them hope, strength, and progress.



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